The Seasoning of South African Woods Nils B Eckbo

ISBN: 9781332233847

Published: September 27th 2015

Paperback

52 pages


Description

The Seasoning of South African Woods  by  Nils B Eckbo

The Seasoning of South African Woods by Nils B Eckbo
September 27th 2015 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, RTF | 52 pages | ISBN: 9781332233847 | 10.40 Mb

Excerpt from The Seasoning of South African WoodsThe cavities, or cells as they are also called, usually contain a watery fluid when the wood is green, but as the wood dries out the water is evaporated, leaving air and a small residue in its place.MoreExcerpt from The Seasoning of South African WoodsThe cavities, or cells as they are also called, usually contain a watery fluid when the wood is green, but as the wood dries out the water is evaporated, leaving air and a small residue in its place.

The cell walls are built up of a substance known as cellulose, which is permeated by a number of materials known as lignin. The walls of these cells in the green tree are saturated with water, leaving the wood soft and pliable.The definition of seasoning may be said to be dehydration with a minimum of damage to the structure of the wood.Dehydration is comparatively easy, but the extent of damage incurred during drying determines the ultimate usefulness of the wood.There are a great number of factors that influence the seasoning of wood in addition to the more or less complicated structure of the wood itself.

Of these may be mentioned -(a) season of cutting trees-(b) dimensions of stock-(c) stacking-(d) atmospheric conditions.Season of Cutting Trees.In all the northern countries of the world that are well forested the season for each logging operation is well denned. Cutting of the trees commences in the late autumn when the farm work is practically ended for the year and labour is plentiful. It may last until the snow comes or continue through the entire winter.

With the first freezing weather the swamps become solid and the skidding commences. All the scattered logs are skidded or dragged by horses usually on a single bob-sleigh to large stacks, from which they are hauled on sleighs later on when the heavy snows come, to the driving stream, or possibly off-loaded on the ice of a lake.

When spring opens up, the logs are floated, or driven as it is usually called, on flood waters to the sawmills, where they may be kept in booms or a mill-pond until such a time as it is convenient to convert them into planks.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy.

In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.



Enter the sum





Related Archive Books



Related Books


Comments

Comments for "The Seasoning of South African Woods":


chirols.eu

©2010-2015 | DMCA | Contact us